The Scoop on Salt

Sitting at the Father’s Day dinner table last night, somehow the topic of salt came up. Everyone was discussing the difference between table salt, kosher salt, sea salt, etc. Low and behold, the most common myth about sea salt came up.

Does sea salt have less sodium and is it better for you than regular table or kosher salt?

The simple answer is no. All types of salt are about 40% sodium (by weight) meaning that sea salt has about the same amount of sodium as an equal amount of any other type of salt. So, don’t think that swapping sea salt for your regular table salt will work wonders on your blood pressure.

But here is the catch- when measuring salt with measuring spoons, 1 teaspoon of sea salt may have less sodium than 1 teaspoon of table salt. This is because sea salt is typically larger crystals so fewer will fit in the measuring spoon (compared to the finely ground table salt). This is the basis behind the common myth that sea salt is “better for you” and contains less sodium.

With that being said, there are some differences between the various types of the most commonly used salts.

  • Sea salt is usually less processed and will contain small amounts of minerals (like potassium, magnesium, and calcium) from the ocean.
  • Table salt is processed to a fine texture (good for mixing into recipes) with impurities and minerals removed.
  • Table salt is usually iodized (it has added iodine) to prevent iodine deficiency which can lead to hypothyroidism and goiter.
  • Kosher salt is coarser and flakier making it good for sprinkling on top of foods for lots of flavor
  • Pink Himalyan salt has lots of minerals giving it more flavor and makes it popular for skin and spa treatments.
  • Check out this link for info about 12 different types of salt http://www.wideopeneats.com/12-different-types-salt-use/

Which type of salt should you choose? You should leave that up to your taste buds. Some may say the minerals in sea salt make it superior, but the amounts are so small that it is almost insignificant. You can get all those same minerals from nutrient dense fruits and vegetables.

Just keep in mind, regardless of the type of salt, they all have almost the same amount of sodium, which one of the largest contributors to high blood pressure and heart disease in America.

The American Heart Association recommends an ideal limit of 1,500mg of sodium per day (max of 2,300mg per day), but the average American has over 3,400mg per day! Watch out though because more than 75% of the sodium most people consume comes from packaged foods like chips, muffins, crackers, cereal, microwave dinners, and canned goods (not from the salt shaker).

Here are some tips to cut back on sodium and prevent high blood pressure:

  • Choose the low sodium or sodium-free version of popular snacks (especially broths and condiments) at the grocery store
  • Buy the “no salt added” canned goods, or rinse your canned veggies and beans off with water before eating them
  • Use spices to add flavor when cooking as opposed to salt
  • Avoid foods with the words pickled, brined, cured, and smoked – this usually means high salt
  • Potassium has the opposite effect on blood pressure than sodium (it can help reduce blood pressure) so incorporate foods like sweet potatoes, bananas, yogurt, and other high potassium foods into your diet
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