Med-Surg, Outpatient, and Change, Oh My!

Boy has this semester flown by! I am officially 1/3 of the way done with my Dietetic Internship and Monday is my last day of class for the semester. Last week marked the end of my general medical-surgical (med-surg) rotations in the hospital, which were a total of eight weeks: two weeks in cystic fibrosis and telemetry, two weeks in geriatrics and trauma step-down, two weeks in cardiac, and two weeks in bone marrow transplant. While I liked some rotations better than others, I honestly didn’t love any of them. Most of the time I was seeing patients due to unintentional weight loss and decreased appetite (both of which are major issues in the hospital). Unfortunately, the standard of practice for these patients is to recommend using high calorie/high protein supplements (which are filled with sugar) and encourage high calorie foods. I also didn’t feel like seeing a patient for 10 minutes, one or two times during their hospital stay really made an impact on their health. I wasn’t encouraging them to eat healthier or make better food choices in their daily life, I was just trying to manage symptoms and ensure they could be discharged as soon as possible. Besides all these dislikes, I did learn that I loved doing calculations for enteral and parenteral nutrition (feeding via a tube or IV) in patients that couldn’t eat food orally.

The past week I have been in my adult outpatient rotation, and I have absolutely loved it so far (which is very reassuring after not loving my previous eight weeks). My preceptors are amazing and I definitely see it as an area I am interested in working in in the future. You get to spend so much more time with the patients and it is exciting to see them learn and make progress with improving their diet. I have also learned a little bit about integrative and functional medicine, which also sparked my interest. It is a growing field and focuses on a mix of different eastern and western medicine techniques, plus uses food as a method of healing different types of diseases.

With all of my experiences this past week in outpatient, I thought I would share a few words of wisdom (per usual). It has been exciting to see all of these patients be so eager and motivated to make change (which is definitely different from the patients in the hospital). But, at the same time, change is difficult and it requires work. You can’t expect to just show up and meet with a dietitian and, poof, you start losing weight or controlling your diabetes. The same thing goes for reading my blog. While I love that people are reading my posts and I am able to share information, reading doesn’t translate to results. In fact, we only remember about 10% of the things we read. In order to make positive changes, you have to take the information you read and hear, and put it into action.

Since this post is getting a little lengthy, I’ll leave it at that for now, but I’ll share more about making changes in my next post!

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