When you are stuck in a rut…

When I was planning my blog post for the week, I had in my head that I was going to do a Dietetic Internship update and talk about all of my exciting National Nutrition Month activities from this month. I’ll definitely do a post on this but it is going to sit on the back burner until next week.

As I have shared here on my blog several times, I have a lot on my plate working as a Dietetic Intern and going to graduate school. Between work, school, assignments, papers, and everything in between, it feels like this semester has sucked the lift out of me. I felt like my mantra was “work, sleep, homework, repeat”. I wasn’t feeling like myself and I even skipped out on going to the gym for two full weeks (which is 100% not like me- exercise is my stress reliever and boost of energy)

This lack of motivation and “blah” feeling really hit me a few weeks ago. I had to get back to my workouts to relieve some stress and give me a jolt of energy. Clearly my typical routine of going to the same gym everyday after work and doing my Kayla Itsines BBG circuit training wasn’t working so I decided to try something new.

In the past, I have found group fitness classes are much more motivating than working out alone. The energy of all the people around me always motivates me so I thought this would be a good place to start. I frequent yoga and spinning classes, but in order to pull me out of my rut I had to jump outside my comfort zone. The solution: find every fitness studio in Cleveland that offers a free first time class and give it a shot.

…And that is exactly what I have been doing. In the last week I went boxing for the first time (something I never thought I would do) and tried out a climbing class on a versa-climber (which, holy s***, was the hardest 30 minutes ever!). Since the weather has been a little bit nicer this week (ie. The sun made a few appearances), I have also been able to go for a few runs outside. Boy, does fresh air do wonders for your mood and energy.

To be completely honest, the last week has been amazing. I feel like a new person, I have so much more energy, my friends can’t get me to shut up about my new favorite workout classes, and I also happened to get some exciting news this week (tune in to next week’s post to find out!).

What is the point of all this and why should you care about my rut?

Well, because I think I can confidently say that everyone falls into a rut at some point. We are all busy with dozens of responsibilities being pulled in dozens of directions that sometimes cause us to get burnt out and lose motivation. Maybe you lose motivation to workout (like me), but maybe it is your schoolwork, job, or something else.

If you get stuck in a rut, don’t just sit down there. Figure out how to pull yourself out. There is no way that we can all be motivated all the time. Einstein famously said, “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results”. If what you are doing now isn’t working then try something new…something that excites you or makes you feel good. Even just stepping outside for 30 minutes a day to get some fresh air can completely change your mood. It might not be easy to step outside your “normal” but it can definitely be worth it!

SMART Goals

My adult outpatient rotation is officially complete and I loved this second week just as much as I did the first! As promised in my last post, I am going to share a little more about making changes. I think we can all agree that making change is hard, and I was reminded of this patient after patient last week. So many of them came in saying they knew exactly what is healthy and what they had to do but they just couldn’t do it.

That is where setting goals comes into play. I’m not talking about a goal of losing 30 pounds, normalizing blood pressure, or managing kidney disease – those are vague and don’t really motivate us to make change. Instead, I encourage patients to set SMART goals. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely.

SMART

Let me give you an example. Say you do want to lose those 30 pounds. What are some ways you will do that? Reduce the number of sugary drinks you have? Start walking more? Eat more vegetables? Those take care of the “Specific” part of your goals but now you have to fill in the M, A, R, and T.

Pretend our patient typically has 2 small Coke’s from McDonald’s every day (one before work and one after work). Here’s the patient’s goal:
S- Have less sugary drinks
M- When the patient only has 1 small Coke each day (until his next appointment with the Dietitian)
A- It is attainable because he will only stop at McDonald’s drive through after work
R- It is realistic for this patient because he is ready and motivated to make that change.
T- Every day

So this person goal is: Limit sugary drink intake to one small coke every day (an improvement from two he is having now). Doesn’t that seem more realistic than losing 30 pounds? – I sure do!

You can do the exact same thing with exercise and eating more veggies. I typically recommend patients have 2-3 goals they will work on each time they make an appointment. Once the goal is consistently achieved they can set new goals. For example, our patient here could set his next goal to be one small Coke every other day, etc. until he is no longer drinking Coke.

Setting these smaller goals that seem achievable makes patients a lot more motivated to actually try to achieve them. They know exactly what they have to do, how to do it, and how long to do it for. Remember, all the little things add up so even small change like this can make a big difference.

What are your health goals and how can you turn them into SMART goals?

Med-Surg, Outpatient, and Change, Oh My!

Boy has this semester flown by! I am officially 1/3 of the way done with my Dietetic Internship and Monday is my last day of class for the semester. Last week marked the end of my general medical-surgical (med-surg) rotations in the hospital, which were a total of eight weeks: two weeks in cystic fibrosis and telemetry, two weeks in geriatrics and trauma step-down, two weeks in cardiac, and two weeks in bone marrow transplant. While I liked some rotations better than others, I honestly didn’t love any of them. Most of the time I was seeing patients due to unintentional weight loss and decreased appetite (both of which are major issues in the hospital). Unfortunately, the standard of practice for these patients is to recommend using high calorie/high protein supplements (which are filled with sugar) and encourage high calorie foods. I also didn’t feel like seeing a patient for 10 minutes, one or two times during their hospital stay really made an impact on their health. I wasn’t encouraging them to eat healthier or make better food choices in their daily life, I was just trying to manage symptoms and ensure they could be discharged as soon as possible. Besides all these dislikes, I did learn that I loved doing calculations for enteral and parenteral nutrition (feeding via a tube or IV) in patients that couldn’t eat food orally.

The past week I have been in my adult outpatient rotation, and I have absolutely loved it so far (which is very reassuring after not loving my previous eight weeks). My preceptors are amazing and I definitely see it as an area I am interested in working in in the future. You get to spend so much more time with the patients and it is exciting to see them learn and make progress with improving their diet. I have also learned a little bit about integrative and functional medicine, which also sparked my interest. It is a growing field and focuses on a mix of different eastern and western medicine techniques, plus uses food as a method of healing different types of diseases.

With all of my experiences this past week in outpatient, I thought I would share a few words of wisdom (per usual). It has been exciting to see all of these patients be so eager and motivated to make change (which is definitely different from the patients in the hospital). But, at the same time, change is difficult and it requires work. You can’t expect to just show up and meet with a dietitian and, poof, you start losing weight or controlling your diabetes. The same thing goes for reading my blog. While I love that people are reading my posts and I am able to share information, reading doesn’t translate to results. In fact, we only remember about 10% of the things we read. In order to make positive changes, you have to take the information you read and hear, and put it into action.

Since this post is getting a little lengthy, I’ll leave it at that for now, but I’ll share more about making changes in my next post!