When you are stuck in a rut…

When I was planning my blog post for the week, I had in my head that I was going to do a Dietetic Internship update and talk about all of my exciting National Nutrition Month activities from this month. I’ll definitely do a post on this but it is going to sit on the back burner until next week.

As I have shared here on my blog several times, I have a lot on my plate working as a Dietetic Intern and going to graduate school. Between work, school, assignments, papers, and everything in between, it feels like this semester has sucked the lift out of me. I felt like my mantra was “work, sleep, homework, repeat”. I wasn’t feeling like myself and I even skipped out on going to the gym for two full weeks (which is 100% not like me- exercise is my stress reliever and boost of energy)

This lack of motivation and “blah” feeling really hit me a few weeks ago. I had to get back to my workouts to relieve some stress and give me a jolt of energy. Clearly my typical routine of going to the same gym everyday after work and doing my Kayla Itsines BBG circuit training wasn’t working so I decided to try something new.

In the past, I have found group fitness classes are much more motivating than working out alone. The energy of all the people around me always motivates me so I thought this would be a good place to start. I frequent yoga and spinning classes, but in order to pull me out of my rut I had to jump outside my comfort zone. The solution: find every fitness studio in Cleveland that offers a free first time class and give it a shot.

…And that is exactly what I have been doing. In the last week I went boxing for the first time (something I never thought I would do) and tried out a climbing class on a versa-climber (which, holy s***, was the hardest 30 minutes ever!). Since the weather has been a little bit nicer this week (ie. The sun made a few appearances), I have also been able to go for a few runs outside. Boy, does fresh air do wonders for your mood and energy.

To be completely honest, the last week has been amazing. I feel like a new person, I have so much more energy, my friends can’t get me to shut up about my new favorite workout classes, and I also happened to get some exciting news this week (tune in to next week’s post to find out!).

What is the point of all this and why should you care about my rut?

Well, because I think I can confidently say that everyone falls into a rut at some point. We are all busy with dozens of responsibilities being pulled in dozens of directions that sometimes cause us to get burnt out and lose motivation. Maybe you lose motivation to workout (like me), but maybe it is your schoolwork, job, or something else.

If you get stuck in a rut, don’t just sit down there. Figure out how to pull yourself out. There is no way that we can all be motivated all the time. Einstein famously said, “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results”. If what you are doing now isn’t working then try something new…something that excites you or makes you feel good. Even just stepping outside for 30 minutes a day to get some fresh air can completely change your mood. It might not be easy to step outside your “normal” but it can definitely be worth it!

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Healthy and Fast Meals with (almost) No Cooking Required

I’m not going to lie, I have slacked off a little (or a lot!) when it comes to cooking this year. Between school, work, trying new workout classes ;), and trying to get a decent amount of sleep, cooking just hasn’t been a priority. But don’t get me wrong, this doesn’t mean I’m having frozen meals or fast food – it just means my meals are a little more simple and don’t take much time to make.

Whether you are a student like me, a working professional, home taking care of kiddos, or have other responsibilities, time is always the number 1 excuse for not eating healthy, so today I thought I would share my tips and tricks for fast and easy, healthy meals.

1. Cook ahead of time – I typically only turn on my oven and stove one or two times a week. I’ll make some chicken, roast some veggies, brown some ground turkey, and cook some rice or quinoa. From start to finish, it usually takes me no more than an hour. I keep everything in separate containers in the fridge so it’s ready when I get home from a long day at work.

2. Build a meal – Now that you have all the food is cooked and ready to be eaten, all you have to do is put it together. Think of it like an assembly line…add some rice, chicken, broccoli, and sauce to a bowl, pop it in the microwave and voila, dinner is served.

3. Oh, wait – there is no step three 😉 It is so easy there are only two steps! See, no excuses!!

Here is a little cheat sheet for building a healthy meal:

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  • Tricks if you are really short on time:
    Choose canned tuna, buy a pre-baked chicken, or try canned beans which don’t require cooking for your protein sources
  • Use frozen veggies that you can steam in the microwave – no baking or chopping required.

Now that you have the “recipe” to build your own healthy meal, I thought I would share some of my favorites. Some might sound strange, but I promise they are tasty! Also, lots are vegetarian since I was experimenting with being a vegetarian for a month.

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No excuses now! What are your favorite meals to build?

Career Confusion

Unfortunately, if your looking for helpful nutrition information, this isn’t the post for you. Instead, it is only an update on my unknown future career plans. But don’t worry, I’ll be dishing up some more advise in my future posts.

I am officially passed the halfway point of my Dietetic Internship! I am currently in my renal (kidney) rotation in a dialysis unit, which is fine…nothing special. I still have critical care, pediatrics, and oncology rotations this semester.

Recently, though, I have been struggling a bit. As I have said before in other posts, I haven’t really loved working in the hospital. I haven’t felt like I make any meaningful connections with patients and most of them don’t seem to care at all about what I am talking to them about, which I totally get – I don’t think that if I were sick in a hospital I would really care about how much salt was in my food or if I was getting enough protein.

I did enjoy my outpatient rotations much more than working in the hospital, but something still wasn’t clicking. I think I almost convinced myself I liked it because that it what I had always pictured myself doing. Do I still see myself doing some nutrition counseling? … Yes, it is definitely something that is still interesting to me, but I am not sure that I can picture myself doing it as a full-time job.

I am very happy I am learning my likes and dislikes now and not later, but you can see why I am confused now. I feel like the college sophomore that realized they didn’t like their major and is trying to figure out what to do. From the time I declared my nutrition major freshman year in undergrad I always saw myself being a Clinical Dietitian, and now I am realizing that is not really the path I want to go down.

Thankfully I have tons of supportive advisors and professors at school that are willing to help me figure out what I want to do. Maybe it is working in industry (for a cool, healthy food company), teaching at local colleges, traveling with an international health organization, working in media or social media, or doing a job that I don’t even know exists — I am exploring my options.

So for now, we will see where the next year takes me. In the mean time, if anyone has any nutrition career suggestions… my ears are open!

Will Power Points

When trying to make healthy lifestyle changes, surrounding yourself with a healthy environment can make the world of a difference. Keeping lots of fresh fruits and vegetables in the house and throwing away all the chips and cookies make it a whole lot easier to reach for something healthy. Seems logical right? I think most people have heard this before, but one of my preceptors made a great analogy that put this concept into a new perspective.

She explained, just like we all have bank accounts filled with dollars, we also have a bank account filled with “will power points”. These are the currency used to make healthy decisions when our environment makes it challenging – like choosing not to have a piece of bread from the bowl on the table while you’re waiting for your meal at a restaurant.

Just like we all have a limited amount of money in the bank, we all have a limited number of “will power points”, so, just like money, we have to spend them wisely. If you are putting yourself in unhealthy environments all of the time, those will power points are going to run out quickly and you are going to give in to unhealthy temptations. But, if you surrounded yourself with a healthy environment most of the time (healthy snacks in the house, choosing restaurants that have lighter or healthier meals, packing your lunch for work or school, etc.), you will still have a stash of will power points to use when you need them.

Just some food for thought…Happy Sunday!

Micros and Macros

In this post, I thought I would take it back to some basics: micronutrients (the little guys) and macronutrients (the big guys).

Micronutrients

Micronutrients are all your vitamins and minerals, like iron, zinc, vitamin D, and vitamin E – just to name a few. They are called micronutrients because you only need a little bit of them each day. Your fruits and vegetables are packed with tons of these, but they are also in lots of other foods.

Micronutrients are responsible for things like eye sight, bone health, thyroid function, blood pressure, and many, many more.

Right now, on the nutrition fact labels you will always see vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron. That is because back in 1990’s when the label was designed, those were the nutrients that people often did not get enough of. Now, you may know that there is a new nutrition fact panel coming out, which will be mandatory for manufacturers to use by 2021. On this label you will see vitamin D, calcium, iron, and potassium since these are the micronutrients that most people are low on now.

Macronutrients

Macronutrients are your carbs (including sugar and fiber), proteins, and fats. They are called macronutrients because – you guessed it – you need large amounts of them each day. Protein rich foods include fish, animal meats, and soy products (like tofu and tempeh). Fats come from foods like avocados, nuts, seeds, oils, and butter. Carbs come from grains (quinoa, bulgur, rye, rice, wheat) and foods made from grains like bread and pasta, corn, peas, and fruits. There are also lots of “combination foods” like beans, eggs, and cheese that provide a good mix of 2 or 3 of these macronutrients.

Macronutrients are our main sources of energy, growth, and building blocks for muscles.

Why does this matter?

Micro and macronutrients are both crucial for survival. We can’t live healthfully if any single one within these two groups is missing. I wanted to talk about this because many food products market themselves as “healthy” because they have extra whole grain or protein. For example, I love Kodiak Cake pancakes, which are “protein packed” and made with 100% whole grains. While it is great to have a little extra protein and whole grains these pancakes don’t have many micronutrients. Now think about broccoli and carrots – super healthy right? Yes, they may be packed full of micronutrients but they have very few macronutrients.

See – that’s why variety is important and eating only vegetables all day isn’t really a good thing. There is no single food that can provide all the nutrients we need. Mix things up, try new foods, and maximize your nutrient intake!

Med-Surg, Outpatient, and Change, Oh My!

Boy has this semester flown by! I am officially 1/3 of the way done with my Dietetic Internship and Monday is my last day of class for the semester. Last week marked the end of my general medical-surgical (med-surg) rotations in the hospital, which were a total of eight weeks: two weeks in cystic fibrosis and telemetry, two weeks in geriatrics and trauma step-down, two weeks in cardiac, and two weeks in bone marrow transplant. While I liked some rotations better than others, I honestly didn’t love any of them. Most of the time I was seeing patients due to unintentional weight loss and decreased appetite (both of which are major issues in the hospital). Unfortunately, the standard of practice for these patients is to recommend using high calorie/high protein supplements (which are filled with sugar) and encourage high calorie foods. I also didn’t feel like seeing a patient for 10 minutes, one or two times during their hospital stay really made an impact on their health. I wasn’t encouraging them to eat healthier or make better food choices in their daily life, I was just trying to manage symptoms and ensure they could be discharged as soon as possible. Besides all these dislikes, I did learn that I loved doing calculations for enteral and parenteral nutrition (feeding via a tube or IV) in patients that couldn’t eat food orally.

The past week I have been in my adult outpatient rotation, and I have absolutely loved it so far (which is very reassuring after not loving my previous eight weeks). My preceptors are amazing and I definitely see it as an area I am interested in working in in the future. You get to spend so much more time with the patients and it is exciting to see them learn and make progress with improving their diet. I have also learned a little bit about integrative and functional medicine, which also sparked my interest. It is a growing field and focuses on a mix of different eastern and western medicine techniques, plus uses food as a method of healing different types of diseases.

With all of my experiences this past week in outpatient, I thought I would share a few words of wisdom (per usual). It has been exciting to see all of these patients be so eager and motivated to make change (which is definitely different from the patients in the hospital). But, at the same time, change is difficult and it requires work. You can’t expect to just show up and meet with a dietitian and, poof, you start losing weight or controlling your diabetes. The same thing goes for reading my blog. While I love that people are reading my posts and I am able to share information, reading doesn’t translate to results. In fact, we only remember about 10% of the things we read. In order to make positive changes, you have to take the information you read and hear, and put it into action.

Since this post is getting a little lengthy, I’ll leave it at that for now, but I’ll share more about making changes in my next post!

Internship Update: Finally Time for Clinical

Last Friday marked a very exciting day…the last day of my food service rotations in my Internship. After 2 long weeks in the kitchen cutting fruit and making sandwiches, 1 week in the storeroom and purchasing, and 3 weeks working with a patient meal service manager, I am finally on to my clinical rotations!

As much as I don’t enjoy food service and could never see myself working in the field, I did have some valuable experiences. I learned just about everything there is to know about what patients can order, how patients order, where their food comes from, how it gets to them, and everything in between. As a dietitian, I can definitely see why it might be important to know what options the patients have while they are in the hospital.

Having my food service rotations first gives me good background knowledge on how the nutrition and dietary departments run, and I think I am well equipped to give patients meal recommendations based on their individual diet needs. I guess that I one perk of getting food service out of the way at the beginning (and I am glad I never have to put on another hair net again!).

Now, I have just finished day 2 of my clinical orientation. Day 1 was learning a lot about the electronic medical record and how the healthcare system works, but I am quickly getting the hang of it. My preceptor covers telemetry, general medicine, and adult cystic fibrosis floors so I have seen quite the variety of patients so far. I got to do my first note on my own today, and diagnosed a patient with moderate malnutrition. The patient’s doctor agreed with my diagnosis, which means the hospital gets reimbursed for my patient visit. I also feel very official (and old/not smart enough) wearing my white lab coat around 😉

That is pretty much all that is going on in the hospital. October is my busiest month with class work so I have been a busy beaver working on all my assignments every day after work. That unfortunately leaves me little time for any new recipes, but I have been enjoying a super simple (and of course, healthy) spaghetti squash bowl for dinner. I just mix spaghetti squash, steamed broccoli, peas, and chicken or ground turkey with some pasta sauce and wah lah… dinner is served.

Internship Status: Week 9/49