Whole Grains

Five weeks (holy cow-I can’t believe it has already been 5 weeks!) of my DI complete and I am finally getting into the swing of things. I have my daily routine down, feel a lot less overwhelmed, and still have time to explore Cleveland and spend a few hours at the grocery store ;).

The highlight of last week was working an outreach table at the outpatient pediatric clinic in the hospital. I spent the day educating patients about the importance of whole grains. I made a poster (which I don’t think I have done since high school), a handout, compiled some recipes, and played a whole grain game with some of the kids. Having quality conversations with some of the parents definitely made me feel like I was making a difference, but playing games with the kids continuously put a smile on my face throughout the day. And even better, not only did I have fun playing with them, they were also able to learn what whole grains were and be introduced to new food items to try! Win-Win!

Since I had the opportunity to teach so many people in the clinic about whole grains, I thought I would share the knowledge here.

Whole grainFirst off…What is a whole grain? You have probably heard of them, but do you really know what they are? A whole grain means that the product contains all three parts of the grain- the germ, endosperm, and bran. White or refined grains only contain the endosperm. The bran and germ are important because they have vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy fats, whereas the endosperm is made mostly of starch.

Whole grains have also been found to prevent stroke, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and constipation. I don’t know about you, but I think those reasons alone are enough to want some whole grains in my everyday meals.

Ok, now that I hopefully have convinced you to eat some whole grains, you have to find them at the store. This can be the tricky part. Lots of packages slap phrases like “100% wheat” and “multi-grain” across the front to pull you in, but these phrases do not mean it is a whole grain. Here’s what you should look for:

  • Check the ingredient list on the box. If a food is a whole grain, the very first word on the ingredient list will be “whole” (ie. Whole wheat flour, whole grain oats, etc.).
  • Words like “brown rice” “bulgur” “quinoa”, “oats” and “wheat berries” listed first in the ingredients also always mean it is a whole grain.
  • Even if the front of the box says “5g of whole grain”, check the ingredients. While it might have some whole grain, if it is not the first ingredient, then the majority of the product is a refined grain.

There are lots of other whole grains including bulgur, millet, farro, barley, amaranth, buckwheat, and rye, which are great for adding to soups and salads or as a side dish. Those sound a little foreign? Try oatmeal or whole grain cereal (like Cheerios) for breakfast. Air-popped popcorn and whole grain crackers (like Wheat Thins) are perfect whole grain snacks. Even using whole grain bread on your lunch sandwich is a step in the right direction.

Making the switch to whole grains can be hard, but small steps can make it easier. A good rule of thumb is the make at least half of the grains you eat each day whole grains. You can also use this as an opportunity to try some new foods!

Here are some pictures from my outreach in the clinic!

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Diet & Exercise, etc.

As promised, I have a Dietetic Internship update and some other goodies to share. These first two weeks have been dedicated to orientation at the hospital. I, along with the four other interns, have sat through lots of HR trainings, lectures about hospital policies, gone on more hospital tours than I can count, and even had a few homework assignments already. Aside from that boring stuff, we did have some sessions that were more interesting and applicable to dietetics, like an intro to the Nutrition Focused Physical Exam, a taste test of the various supplements the hospital can supply to patients, and we did some patient-clinician role playing to prepare for talking with patients.

IMG_9871In other very exciting news, I officially can check “run a half marathon” off my bucket list. At 9:58am this morning, I crossed the finish line of the Rock and Roll Half Marathon in Cleveland. Miles 10-12 were definitely a struggle and required a little walking, but I ran the first 10 and the last 1.3 without stopping. Considering my longest training run was 10 miles and I wasn’t planning on running the full 13.1 until October, I am pretty happy with how I did. I decided to run it two months early because I quickly realized, during week 1 at the hospital, fitting long runs into my busy schedule was not realistic.

Now, I am home, have eaten more food than I thought possible (Note: running 13.1 miles makes you very hungry!), and my legs are officially jello. Since getting up off the couch is not really an option right now, I thought I would also add something to this post that is maybe more relevant to you (as opposed to just leaving it as an update on my life).

Since I’m in the half marathon spirit, talking about workouts seems appropriate. While workouts and healthy eating are usually two peas in a pod, I have stayed away from writing about them too much because I have no background or credentials surrounding fitness or exercise. But, I do know a thing or two about the relationship between diet and exercise, which I can share that emphasize the importance of a quality diet:

  1. I’m pretty sure we have all heard that “You can’t outrun a bad diet” and “Abs are made in the kitchen”. While these phrases may seem silly, there is a little bit of truth to them. We, as a society often underestimate how much we eat and overestimate how much we burn during a workout (the cardio machines that give false calorie readings don’t help). So, it can be really hard to burn enough calories in a workout to compensate for the two extra cookies last night. Personally, those two extra cookies aren’t worth a whole ‘nother hour at the gym (see the graphic below)…I’ll stick to one cookie.

    food calories to workout convesion

    Calories in food equivalent to workouts (I think these workouts are a little but underestimated, but you get the point)

  2. Surprise! It isn’t all about the number on the scale. Maybe those extra hours in the gym are worth it to you (or you naturally have a fast metabolism) and you eat anything and everything you want. Just because you fall into a healthy weight category doesn’t make you immune to sodium increasing you blood pressure or saturated fat clogging your arteries.
  3. Diet and exercise are not one or the other. They are both important and you need to find a balance. Here are just a two examples… exercise can increase HDL (good cholesterol) which diet can’t do, and fruits and vegetables provide antioxidants that can reduce your risk of cancer and heart disease.
  4. A poor diet often leads to low energy, poor sleep, and negative mood meaning your workout (or any part of your daily life) probably won’t be that great or productive if your not eating well.

These are just a few examples of why a healthy, well-balanced diet are so important. Now, I’m not ragging on exercise (see #3), While the “diet pea” might fit very nicely in that pod with the “exercise pea”, sometimes they need to stand on their own and be recognized for their individual benefits. Trust me, after training for a half marathon, I get that after a good sweaty workout you feel like you deserve a giant chocolate bar and a bag of chips, but in reality, that isn’t going to work (not for losing weight or for overall health).

I hope this helps, eat more veggies, and stay sweaty!

Lemon Chia Muffins

Two years in the books! I am not quite sure what I expected when I started blogging, but I never imagined that I would keep it up for this long (I honestly thought it might be one of those novelties that is cool at first but wears off). Either way, I have really enjoyed writing about my food and nutrition experiences.

Just like last year, I thought I would share healthy and lemony recipe to celebrate: Lemon Chia Muffins. Testing out this recipe was just a little more exciting than any other recipe I’ve made. Why, you ask? Because it was the very first thing I ever cooked/baked in my very own apartment! Technically my Blogiversary is August 1, but I was a little busy moving back to Cleveland. There are lots of “firsts” for me this month: first apartment, first day of my Dietetic Internship, and first day of grad school so I am sure I will have lots to share.

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Anyways, back to the muffins. They are packed with tons of nutrients that you wouldn’t find in your typical sugar-filled muffins. The whole wheat flour provides more protein, fiber, iron, and magnesium than white flour. That being said, baking with whole wheat flour makes cakes and muffins a lot more dense and chewy (I thought these tasted great with this texture but it is not your typical crumbly muffin). The chia seeds also pack in some fiber and the Greek yogurt adds protein and calcium.

Each muffin comes in at about 140 calories, only 1g of fat, and 6g of protein (that’s the same as 1-2 egg whites- but tastes much better!).

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Summer Plans and Future Blogging

As promised, I am back with a summer plans update. (If you want to know what I have been up to the past 5 months, check out my last post.) Being that my Dietetic Internship (DI) starts August 7, my summer is cut a bit shorter than usual…and it is probably my last summer ever since my DI/grad school will run from August 2017-December 2018 without much of a break. That means I am planning to have a very exciting and busy summer, hopefully with some relaxation involved too!

If you know me, you know traveling is obviously #1 on my to do list. Here are the plans so far:

  • Two days after commencement, my family is going to Peru for 10 days of adventure
  • We have a long weekend in New Jersey for my cousin’s graduation
  • A girls, long weekend trip planned in Chicago with my mom and cousins
  • My grandma and I are spending a week in San Francisco and Napa in July
  • I have a trip to Boston in the works with a friend
  • And hopefully I will also be able to squeeze in a weekend visit to see my friends in Cleveland and Columbus

I’ll also be working and coaching gymnastics here and there, cooking up some new recipes in the kitchen (my goal is to make 1-2 new recipes each week, which I will share…if they turn out well, of course), trying new Detroit restaurants while I am home, and getting ready to move into my first solo apartment. I will be living in Downtown Cleveland for the duration of my 18-month program. I am excited to not only live downtown close to all the good restaurants (obviously food is #1) but also experience Cleveland from a new angle. Since I want to move to Downtown Detroit when I graduate, I think this will be a great way to make sure I enjoy living in a growing urban area.

This brings me to my plans for future blogging. Part of the reason I took a little break from blogging is that I started to run out of ideas. Between gathering images, information, and trying to figure out what the lesson from each post should be, it was just a little too time consuming and began to feel like a chore.

With that being said, I still love writing these posts and sharing my experiences with you. That means, I am still going to be posting (hopefully even more now!) but the posts won’t be so much about sharing information and research or trying to teach a lesson. I will probably be writing more about healthy (and yummy) new things I find at the grocery store, healthy and cool new restaurants I try, and my travel adventures (which obviously will include a lot of food). I’m sure there will still be tips for making healthy choices and probably some interesting food facts here and there, but those won’t be the focus of the posts.

Honestly, I’m not sure how it is going to work out so I guess we will find out together 😉

Dana

Back & Better Than Ever

I guess senior year got the best of me and The Lemon Wedge took the back seat. But no worries, I am back to blogging. I thought I would use this post to update you on what I have been up to this last semester and what I have planned for the future.

As I have talked about before, in order to make my dreams of being a Registered Dietitian (RD) come true, I have to complete a Dietetic Internship (read more here). Soooo last summer and fall took the GRE, narrowed down the list of programs I would apply to and began working on my applications. The process to apply is similar to a residency after medical school where you apply to many programs but are only “matched”/accepted to one program (or you don’t match at all and have to reapply the next year). Deadline for applications was February 15th so I kept busy over winter break and the first few weeks of my semester writing, revising, and re-revising my personal IMG_7271statements over and over and over again until I could practically recite them to you by heart. Finally, on February 14th, with trembling hands, I clicked the infamous “submit” button. From there, it was a big waiting game until “Match Day” when you find out the results.

I ended up applying to 6 different Dietetic Internships, all which were combined with a Master’s degree program: University Hospitals (Cleveland), Veteran’s Affairs Hospital (Cleveland), Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland), Ohio State (Columbus), Rush Medical Center (Chicago), and Tufts Medical Center (Boston).

Finally, Match Day (April 2) rolled around and at 7pm on the nose I logged into my online application to find out that I had matched with my first choice- University Hospitals (Cleveland) and I would stay at Case Western Reserve University to get my Master’s in Nutrition! It was quite an exciting day and I felt a huge weight lifted off my shoulders…I was officially and “RD2Be”!

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Celebrating with Tacos and Sangria

In other exciting news from this semester:
-I had my first research paper published in the Current Nutrition Reports journal. It was a paper that I co-authored as part of my independent study class last semester about dietary supplement use in older adults.

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President Snyder and I 🙂

-I also was selected to be one of the students who decided which professor at the university receives the Excellence in Mentoring award. Being on this committee got me an invitation to Barbara Snyder’s house for a fancy reception…exciting!! (She is the president of the university and basically a celebrity around here!)

That brings us to today. I am currently writing this blog post, as it seemed like a great way to procrastinate studying for my last final exam as an undergraduate (#senoritis). I have one last exam in Pathophysiology next Wednesday before I am done. Then there is a week and a half of lots of food and fun activities with my fellow graduating seniors before commencement.

Now that you are up to speed on the past 5 months, and this post is getting long, I am going to call it quits here. I should get back to studying, but in the next few days I will be writing another post about my summer plans and my future plans for The Lemon Wedge.

Glad to be back!

Dana

What I Learned From Losing My Fitbit

Last week, I had a very traumatic event happen…I lost my Fitbit (okay, maybe traumatic is an exaggeration but I digress). Thankfully, my mom had one that she didn’t use at home and could send to me at school. Still, this left me Fitbit-less for about a week. One day that week, I had the strangest thought while walking to class. I felt like walking wasn’t worth anything because I had nothing to show for it (ie. No big green star at the end of the day when I hit my step goal). I quickly had to shake myself out of that crazy thought. It blew my mind that losing this little piece of technology and not being able to see how many steps I had taken made my walking feel useless.

I did, though, get a good lesson out of this crazy thought of mine: My life is constantly a numbers game: how many steps I take, how many ounces of water I drink, how many calories I eat, how many minutes I exercise for, and the list continues. I can have a few OCD tendencies at times; I like to keep track and make sure everything is neat and organized and I guess counting all these things can bring a little bit of organization to my life. Even if you aren’t someone like me who is obsessed with counting steps, calories, minutes, and ounces, it seems like that is what we are recommended to do. The US Food and Drug Administration recommends we consume about 2.5 cups of vegetables, 2000 calories, 5.5 ounces of protein, and 64 ounces of water each day.

My point is that we are a numbers and counting driven society even though that is not the recommended way to lose weight or create a “healthy” diet. Counting and recording everything has been proven to be an ineffective way to have long-term weight loss – it is just not a sustainable behavior. Instead, listening to your body and making logical decisions about what and when to eat and exercise is the best way to go. This crazy thought during my Fitbit-less walk showed me that I need to do a better job of just listening to my body and not worrying about the numbers- especially when it comes to physical activity.

Is your stomach growling? Go get something healthy to eat. Are you full? Stop eating- you don’t have to finish everything on your plate. Craving chocolate? Break a few squares off of the big bar, enjoy them, and leave the rest for later. The same goes for exercise. Sitting at a desk all day? Get up and go for a walk. Sore muscles and exhausted? Take a rest day. Feeling unmotivated? Remember that exercise will make you feel better so go get it done!

Your body knows exactly what it needs, you just have to learn how to listen and understand the cues it gives you. I know it isn’t as easy as it sounds. It takes time and work to be “on the same page” as your body. Setting number driven goals (like 10,000 steps per day) might be beneficial to working towards a target weight or activity level, but in the end, it is all about how you feel. Whether you meet those goals or not, if you aren’t feeling good all the calories and steps you counted don’t mean anything. You should always try to feel healthy, not hungry, tired, or deprived.

Dietetic Internship Search Update
The beginning of senior year means the hunt and application process for a Dietetic Internship (DI) has begun. A DI is a 1200-hour supervised practice program a student must go through to in order to sit for a board exam to become a Registered Dietitian (read more about the process here). I am looking at DI’s that have a master’s degree program combined, so that narrows down my options but there are still lots to choose from.

Step one in applying to any of these programs is taking the GRE (Graduate Records Exam), which I just took in August. I got my scores this week and thankfully I did well enough that I don’t need to take it again!

The next steps are figuring out exactly where I am going to apply and starting my personal statement. Stay tuned for more DI updates 🙂

Back To School: Senior Year

Happy hump day! It has been a while since my last post, so here is a little life update. Monday marked the first day of classes for this semester…well for most people. I, somehow, got lucky enough to only have classes on Tuesday’s and Thursday’s this semester! It might should like I have quite the relaxed semester, but don’t worry. I will be keeping busy with my senior capstone project, an independent study literature review research paper, applying to grad school/Dietetic Internships, and my new student research position at the Cleveland Clinic. My research job doesn’t start until next week, but I am super excited to explore the research side of nutrition. I will be working with patients who have Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, teaching them how to comply to a Mediterranean diet, and doing some data collection.

Yesterday was my first official day of class so I got to meet all my professors and read several pages of daunting syllabi with all my assignments and exams to look forward to…NOT. My classes this semester are Community Nutrition, Child Nutrition, and Guided Study in Nutrition Practice. While the first day isn’t a great indicator, my favorite class so far is Guided Study. I am going to learn how to talk to patients, ask relevant questions, and figure out how to come up with a proper nutrition diagnoses and action plans based on the patients needs. This class is bringing my Registered Dietitian goals to life; it showed me that the information and skills I am learning will actually be relevant to my job in the future (who knew? J).

On another note, back to school means back to meal planning and packing lunches. I made my meal plan and prepped my meals over the weekend before I got busy with classes, but I am going to have to get back into the groove. I have to remember to be thorough in my planning because popping over to the grocery store is not as easy on campus as it is living at home (learned that the hard way after I forgot eggs this weekend). This week my typical oatmeal is on tap for breakfast, quinoa with ground turkey and sweet potato for lunch, and veggies burgers (recipe coming soon) with guac for dinner.

Since I haven’t been at school since last December because of my study abroad trip, I forgot about all of the free food around campus that can be so tempting! Free donuts if I join the Chess Club, a mini cupcake if I sign up for the Math Club, and even free candy for walking past the Student Dietetic Association table (this one has never made sense to me, haha). I will definitely be arming myself with lots of healthy snacks tomorrow (including apples, string cheese, trail mix, and Skinny Pop) to keep me satiated and to have a healthy alternative when walking past the sugary bribes on the way to class.

I hope to try out some new recipes this weekend and learn some fun nutrition facts in my classes to share next week!