Diets and Restriction

My birthday was back at the beginning of July and I got this card:

First, can we all just admire how perfect it is for an aspiring Dietitian like me? It just made me so happy!

Ok, on a more serious note, it made me think a lot about how different people perceive food. Everywhere you go, you can find someone who doesn’t eat dairy, is vegetarian, is on a low carb diet, etc. On one hand, I am happy that people are becoming more and more interested in nutrition, but on the other hand, I cringe when I hear exaggerated news headlines become the basis for everyday food choices. One study on mice finds that bread made the mice gain weight and all of a sudden nobody will eat bread.

My guess is that the minute those “anti-bread” people walk into an Italian restaurant with fresh baked bread and butter sitting on the table, their “no bread” rule flies out the window and the next thing they know, they are 4 slices deep.

IMG_3533That’s because restriction leads to binging. When we restrict ourselves from eating bread (or any food/food group) we feel deprived. It is not practical to say you’ll never going to eat bread again. It is much more reasonable to allow bread in your everyday diet in smaller amounts. And guess what, you’ll probably end up eating less bread this way because you won’t sit down and devour a whole loaf like you would if you were deprived. You also won’t end up with any horrible guilt after you eat it.

The moral of the story is that you shouldn’t eliminate any food or food group from your diet. While some research might say bread is “bad”, I can almost guarantee that there is equally as much research stating the opposite. So, think twice before that news headline affects what you eat today.

I know it is cliché and I have said it before – everything in moderation, enjoy the foods you love, and no foods are bad foods.

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Say Ta-Ta to Trans Fat

New research is always coming out telling us what we should and shouldn’t eat. From red meat giving us cancer to avocados making us skinny, the information we get about food can be confusing. One thing that hasn’t changed is the research regarding trans fat (the type of fat in partially hydrogenated oils). Trans fats are the worst of all the fats in our food and are strongly linked to causing cardiovascular disease.

Fortunately, just about one year ago, the FDA removed partially hydrogenated oils from the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. That means, from that date, companies have three years to remove all trans fats from their products. Currently, trans fats can be found in products like margarines, fried food, non-dairy creamers, cookies, and crackers.

Until 2018 when trans fat is removed from our food, you should still be checking food labels and preventing consumption of trans fats. It is also important to make sure the ingredients do not include any partially hydrogenated oils. That’s because companies can legally label their product as having zero grams of trans fat as long as they have less than .5 grams per serving. Meaning, there can still be trans fat in a product even if the label says there is none.

Read more about the ban on trans fats here.

Read more about how different types of fat affect the body here.