Go Further with Food

Happy National Nutrition Month! March is National Nutrition Month and every year the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics decides on a theme – this year it is “Go Further with Food” and they are focusing on reducing food waste.

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Now, some people think that I take my eco-friendliness a little too far (it takes me over a month to fill up 1 garbage bag), but over the past few years I have been trying to create as little waste as possible.

Did you know that food makes up more of our landfills than any other product (even more than plastic), and American’s throw out about one third of all food produced an purchased. Think about that…What is 33% of your last grocery bill? Now imagine throwing that chunk of change in the trash!!

So, in honor of this year’s National Nutrition Month theme, I thought I would share some of my favorite tips for reducing food waste:

  1. Plan– I know I have said this before, but planning before grocery shopping makes the world of a difference. You can figure out exactly what you have and what you need so you don’t end up with any extra (which means no food waste and no extra $$ spent).
  2. Freeze– Your freezer is your best friend when it comes to reducing food waste. Bread nearing its expiration date? Freeze it! Strawberries getting a little mushy? Freeze them! Leftovers from dinner that you don’t want right away? Freeze them! Get my drift? Even fresh herbs can be frozen in ice cube trays to be used for cooking later.
  3. Use all parts of a food – Keep you skins on potatoes and cucumbers and don’t even think about cutting off the broccoli stems. There is no reason to throw these veggie parts into the landfill. Not only are they edible, they also add tons of nutritious value.

I challenge you to reduce the amount of waste you create in the kitchen. These tips can help you reduce your food waste, but reducing waste from other sources is good too. Use rags instead of paper towel, stop buying paper plates/plastic silverware and use real dishes, and switch from plastic bags to reusable containers. Every little bit helps keep our planet greener, cleaner, and healthier.

Eating Seasonally

With spring in full swing (aside from the short snow-fall today in Denmark!) farmers markets and grocery stores all around Copenhagen are starting to display their brightest and juiciest produce. Everything from strawberries to watermelons are at the very front of the store just waiting for you to give into the fruity deliciousness you have missed all winter. I’m not joking when I say “missed”. Here, in Denmark, it is pretty difficult to find produce that isn’t grown in Denmark (or at least in a nearby country). The Danes are very supportive of local farmers and only eating fruits and vegetables that are in season. That means for pretty much all of the winter, you can only find things like apples, oranges, and plums. Grapes, kiwis, and especially berries are pretty much impossible to find during the colder months. While I have definitely missed some of natures candy during my last three months in Denmark, there are lots of perks to eating only fruits and vegetables that are in season. Here are some that I have discovered since living here and talking to the Danes:

  1. Environment- This fits in well with yesterday’s celebration of Earth Day. Eating seasonally and locally is good for the environment! It eliminates the need for truck and airplane shipping pollution, refrigeration, green house operations, and chemical/pesticide use. When I go grocery shopping, the environment is one of the last things I think about (I usually focus on cost and taste), but it is important to remember that the environment plays a big role in the food we eat and our overall health.
  2. Taste- When fruits and vegetables are grown with real sunlight (not artificial lamps and greenhouses), the produce grows with much more flavor and fruits are much sweeter.
  3. Cost- When a food is in season, there is usually an abundance of it. We all know from high school econ that that means price goes down. Also, local and season foods don’t come from miles away so that eliminates the shipping costs of the product. Farmers markets are a great way to cash in on some cheap, yet high quality produce.
  4. Variety- Although it is sad to not have any strawberries for the entire winter, it makes springtime that much more exciting when they appear in the stores. Eating seasonal produce also encourages you to try some new fruits and vegetables you might not otherwise try. You have to make do with what is available!
  5. Nutrients- Every minute after a fruit or vegetable is picked from the ground, it loses nutrient content. Therefore, the shorter the “farm to table” time is, the more nutrients that will be available to fuel your body.

Obviously, living in northern climates does not allow us to eat 100% seasonal, but something is better than nothing. Try choosing 2-3 items that you will only buy when they are in season. If you are up for a challenge, you can always try more!