My 6 Tidbits of Advice for Dietetic Interns

Last year, before I started my Dietetic Internship, a girl in the class above me reached out to provide some advice and answer any questions I had about the dietetic internship that I would be starting.

She told me, “You will learn more about what you don’t like, rather than what you do like during the internship”.

This didn’t faze me as earth shattering advice at the time, but let me tell you, when 5 months of clinical rotations had passed and I couldn’t name a single area I really enjoyed, nor could I ever envision myself being a clinical dietitian, that advice was life saving. I still had a few moments of panic (I knew I still wanted to be a dietitian, but suddenly I had no idea what I wanted to do as a dietitian), but knowing that it is okay to not enjoy parts (or whole chunks) of the internship was very reassuring. There are so many areas of dietetics that you may not be exposed to in your internship, so there is still so many other opportunities to find where you fit in. And don’t worry- I’m still trying to figure out what that niche is for me.

Anyways, since I received that invaluable piece of advice prior to starting my internship, and now having completed an internship myself, I thought I would share a few pieces of advice for any RD2Be’s out there.

  1. Going along with the advice I was given, I would tell people to find an internship with tons of different rotations/areas of experience – especially if you don’t really know what area you want to go into. I worked in more than 25 different clinical areas during my internship, and although a didn’t love any of them, there were definitely some I liked more than others and I discovered interests that I didn’t know I had. Even if you do have a specific area of interest, gaining experience in a number of different fields will make you a better dietitian all around.
  2. Practice what you preach as a dietitian. Dietetic internships can be extremely busy and stressful, especially if you are also completing as masters degree at the same time (like me). It can be easy to slack off, skip workouts, and order pizza for dinner, but as future RDN’s, we all know that those choices aren’t the best for our physical or mental health. Make sure you have plenty of fruits and veggies to snack on and especially get a solid 7-8 hours of sleep every night.
  3. Ask lots of questions! I was terrified starting my first rotation because I felt like I didn’t know enough. Guess what…you aren’t supposed to know everything – that is why you are there. I never had a preceptor who wasn’t willing to answer my oodles of questions – especially regarding areas of nutrition that I didn’t learn a lot about in undergrad.
  4. Similarly, take advantage of all the knowledge your preceptors have to offer. This goes for nutrition knowledge (again, ask questions!), but I also liked to pick their brains about life and career advice. They all landed a job as a clinical dietitian and most had other jobs and experiences prior to their current job, so they have lots of valuable information to offer about careers in dietetics.
  5. I know I probably don’t have to say this to a bunch of type A, aspiring dietitians, but say on top of your work and manage your time well. I guess this mainly goes for interns who are also getting their masters at the same time (like I did), but you definitely don’t want to fall behind and let the workload pile up. Start your assignments early, chip away at them every day, and you will definitely still have time to enjoy life!
  6. Finally, your internship is the greatest study tools and experience to prepare you to be a dietitian. I remember worrying during the first few weeks of my internship that I needed to start taking notes or studying for the RD exam (this was when I still had 11 months of internship ahead of me!). Now, having passed the RD exam, I can confidently say that there is nothing to worry about. Those 1,200+ hours spent working during your internship aren’t for nothing and prepare you very well to be a dietitian and pass your exam.
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