Top 5 Healthy Springtime Tips

Even though spring has barely sprung outside, the spring semester is coming to an end. Tomorrow is my last day of class for the semester! Thankfully I don’t have any final exams, just one presentation on Wednesday and then I will no longer say that I am in school and working at the hospital at the same time. Now I’m taking a week of rest and relaxation until I hit the books again to start studying for my RD board exams (it makes me nervous just thinking about it!).

Since we are well into spring, I thought I would just share some of my 5 favorite things to do in the spring to stay healthy and happy!

1. Go outside! I know the cold weather is still lingering (especially up here in Cleveland), but getting fresh air and sunlight has been found to increase energy, decrease stress, improve digestion, and give your immune system a boost. Going for a walk is a great way to try to hit your 10,000 steps for the day and soak up some vitamin D.
2. Clean! Throwing out all the unnecessary stuff in your house/apartment/room has some surprising benefits. Living in a clean and uncluttered space decreases stress levels and makes you more productive. Not to mention, people who live in clean spaces are more likely to eat healthy, and cleaning can be a bit of a workout 😉
3. Check out a farmers market! The growing season is in full swing and farmers markets are the perfect for stocking up on produce. They are a great way to try out a new fruit or vegetable, see what is in season, and support local farmers. Plus you get the great to know exactly where your food came from and how it was grown.
4. Socialize! The longer days and rooftop restaurants & bars are the perfect excuse to spend time with friends and family. Spending time talking with other people can boost mental health and reduce your risk for dementia.
5. This is a big one…get ready…Put your phone down! It is so easy to get caught up in the virtual world of work and social media that it can be hard to disconnect (I’m guilty of it too), but try to unplug for at least an hour every day. Maybe put your phone in airplane mode an hour before bed, don’t check email or social media for at least an hour after you wake up, or leave your phone at home while you do my first four tips. It will help you be less distracted, more productive, more present, and you might even talk to someone and make a new friend.

Happy spring!

Cruising to the Finish Line

Happy April! I guess it has been quite a while since I wrote my last official update on my Dietetic Internship in December. It seems like every day goes by so slowly but suddenly I only have 4 weeks left of this semester of school and 15 weeks lefts of my Internship.

Since December I have had my bariatric rotation, renal (kidney) rotation in a dialysis unit, critical care rotations in the Medical, Surgical, Trauma, and Neuro Intensive Care Units, and now I am in my pediatric rotations. I definitely enjoyed critical care more than I thought I would and more than I enjoyed my general medical/surgical rotations earlier in the year. It was a lot less talking to patients (mostly because they were sedated and on a ventilator), and a lot more tube feeding and TPN (IV nutrition) calculations.

I originally started my Internship thinking I would want to work in pediatrics, but by the time I started peds I knew it probably wasn’t where I really wanted to end up. The past three weeks in my general pediatrics were definitely a nice change of pace getting to see kids, but it is also a whole new world. I feel like I am back at square one trying to learn all the different infant formulas. My next three weeks are in the Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Units, which I think I am going to like a lot more than general pediatrics since I liked the adult ICUs.

Between all of my clinical rotations, we also had a ton of activities in March for National Nutrition Month. We had one full week dedicated to doing things in the community, including playing fruit and vegetable games with kids at a Head Start preschool, teaching a nutrition health class at a high school, participating in a high school health fair, and doing a food demo for hospital employees. Our biggest event was the National Nutrition Month Celebration Day in the atrium cafeteria at the hospital. Each intern, including myself, put together a big presentation board, an activity, and several handouts about a specific nutrition topic.img_1214.jpg My topic was plant-based diets (don’t worry, I’m not saying you should become a vegetarian or vegan). I discussed the importance of limiting meat consumption and encouraged more beans, vegetables, and whole grains. Not only are there lots of health benefits of plant based foods, you also get more variety of nutrients by switching things up. (I have included my plant based grocery list and plant based protein source handouts here, too!)

Plant Based Grocery List

Plant Based Protein Sources

From all of these community events I realized that I take for granted how much I know about nutrition. Because nutrition is the world I have been living in for the past 5 years, I sometimes forget what the average person knows. Some of the questions I got during the week really reminded me that people don’t know enough about nutrition and I have a lot of valuable knowledge to share.

I also had a big presentation for all of the hospital dietitians in March, which was probably the most nerve-racking experience ever. So, now that March/National Nutrition Month is over, I feel like I am just cruising to the finish line. I have a few big papers do before the end of April for school, one more big presentation at the hospital, and only three more major rotations until my Internship is over!

And for the final (and most exciting) update, I recently found out I won a scholarship for an educational international travel experience once I graduate in December! The location of my trip has not been confirmed, but I will keep you posted when I decide.

I guess I need to do these updates more often so they aren’t so long. Until next week, Happy Easter and Happy Passover from this RD2Be!

Eating Seasonally

With spring in full swing (aside from the short snow-fall today in Denmark!) farmers markets and grocery stores all around Copenhagen are starting to display their brightest and juiciest produce. Everything from strawberries to watermelons are at the very front of the store just waiting for you to give into the fruity deliciousness you have missed all winter. I’m not joking when I say “missed”. Here, in Denmark, it is pretty difficult to find produce that isn’t grown in Denmark (or at least in a nearby country). The Danes are very supportive of local farmers and only eating fruits and vegetables that are in season. That means for pretty much all of the winter, you can only find things like apples, oranges, and plums. Grapes, kiwis, and especially berries are pretty much impossible to find during the colder months. While I have definitely missed some of natures candy during my last three months in Denmark, there are lots of perks to eating only fruits and vegetables that are in season. Here are some that I have discovered since living here and talking to the Danes:

  1. Environment- This fits in well with yesterday’s celebration of Earth Day. Eating seasonally and locally is good for the environment! It eliminates the need for truck and airplane shipping pollution, refrigeration, green house operations, and chemical/pesticide use. When I go grocery shopping, the environment is one of the last things I think about (I usually focus on cost and taste), but it is important to remember that the environment plays a big role in the food we eat and our overall health.
  2. Taste- When fruits and vegetables are grown with real sunlight (not artificial lamps and greenhouses), the produce grows with much more flavor and fruits are much sweeter.
  3. Cost- When a food is in season, there is usually an abundance of it. We all know from high school econ that that means price goes down. Also, local and season foods don’t come from miles away so that eliminates the shipping costs of the product. Farmers markets are a great way to cash in on some cheap, yet high quality produce.
  4. Variety- Although it is sad to not have any strawberries for the entire winter, it makes springtime that much more exciting when they appear in the stores. Eating seasonal produce also encourages you to try some new fruits and vegetables you might not otherwise try. You have to make do with what is available!
  5. Nutrients- Every minute after a fruit or vegetable is picked from the ground, it loses nutrient content. Therefore, the shorter the “farm to table” time is, the more nutrients that will be available to fuel your body.

Obviously, living in northern climates does not allow us to eat 100% seasonal, but something is better than nothing. Try choosing 2-3 items that you will only buy when they are in season. If you are up for a challenge, you can always try more!