Trying New Foods

I love exploring and trying new things, especially when it comes to food. In some of my other posts I have talked about how I love going to the grocery store—it is so exciting for to see what new products I can find and new foods I can try. Going to restaurants is always a struggle because I always want to try everything on the menu.

When it comes to nutrition, trying new things is a good habit to have. Why? Here are some reasons:

  1. Adding variety increases the types of nutrients you get. Eating the same 5 fruits and vegetables isn’t bad, but it also means that you are missing out on the nutrients you can get from other kinds of fruits and veggies. Try eating a variety of different colors- different color fruits and veggies provide different types of vitamins and minerals. This goes for whole grains and low-fat dairy products as well.
  2. You might eventually learn to like something. We have all heard that you have to try a food 8-12 times before you know if you really dislike it. That’s because our natural instinct is to dislike unfamiliar foods. Our first impression is often wrong so try something at least a few times before you give it an official ruling.
  3. You might find something you didn’t know you liked. What do you have to lose? If you never try you will never know if you like it!
  4. For the world travelers like me, it makes traveling is easier. The more foods you like and the more you are willing to try, the easier it is to find things to eat in foreign countries. Plus you get to experience the local food culture instead of relying on a suitcase full of protein bars. (When I studied abroad, one of my friends was very picky so finding a place to eat was a big challenge and often took several hours of research.)
  5. It sets a good example for kids. If you spend any time around kids, you know that they want to follow your every move. If they see you eating all different kinds of foods, they are more likely to do the same.

If trying new foods is not your thing, start small. Instead of trying completely new foods, try preparing some of your favorites with new seasonings or toppings. Buying one new vegetable per week and adding it to your dinner is also a small, realistic step to expanding your palate.

While I am really good at spending hours in the grocery store finding new types of nut butter, fancy snack bars, and unique fruits and vegetables I have gotten pretty lazy about trying new recipes. So, my goal for the rest of the semester is to print off two new recipes to try each week. Hopefully I’ll make some yummy, new things to share with you!

What is your goal for trying new foods?

Eating Seasonally

With spring in full swing (aside from the short snow-fall today in Denmark!) farmers markets and grocery stores all around Copenhagen are starting to display their brightest and juiciest produce. Everything from strawberries to watermelons are at the very front of the store just waiting for you to give into the fruity deliciousness you have missed all winter. I’m not joking when I say “missed”. Here, in Denmark, it is pretty difficult to find produce that isn’t grown in Denmark (or at least in a nearby country). The Danes are very supportive of local farmers and only eating fruits and vegetables that are in season. That means for pretty much all of the winter, you can only find things like apples, oranges, and plums. Grapes, kiwis, and especially berries are pretty much impossible to find during the colder months. While I have definitely missed some of natures candy during my last three months in Denmark, there are lots of perks to eating only fruits and vegetables that are in season. Here are some that I have discovered since living here and talking to the Danes:

  1. Environment- This fits in well with yesterday’s celebration of Earth Day. Eating seasonally and locally is good for the environment! It eliminates the need for truck and airplane shipping pollution, refrigeration, green house operations, and chemical/pesticide use. When I go grocery shopping, the environment is one of the last things I think about (I usually focus on cost and taste), but it is important to remember that the environment plays a big role in the food we eat and our overall health.
  2. Taste- When fruits and vegetables are grown with real sunlight (not artificial lamps and greenhouses), the produce grows with much more flavor and fruits are much sweeter.
  3. Cost- When a food is in season, there is usually an abundance of it. We all know from high school econ that that means price goes down. Also, local and season foods don’t come from miles away so that eliminates the shipping costs of the product. Farmers markets are a great way to cash in on some cheap, yet high quality produce.
  4. Variety- Although it is sad to not have any strawberries for the entire winter, it makes springtime that much more exciting when they appear in the stores. Eating seasonal produce also encourages you to try some new fruits and vegetables you might not otherwise try. You have to make do with what is available!
  5. Nutrients- Every minute after a fruit or vegetable is picked from the ground, it loses nutrient content. Therefore, the shorter the “farm to table” time is, the more nutrients that will be available to fuel your body.

Obviously, living in northern climates does not allow us to eat 100% seasonal, but something is better than nothing. Try choosing 2-3 items that you will only buy when they are in season. If you are up for a challenge, you can always try more!